KATZENBERG MEMO PDF

Its subsequent circulation in Hollywood caused a huge stir. Jeffrey Katzenberg left Disney three years later. Huge, heartfelt thanks to Leah for transcribing this for me; said transcript can be found below the images — click here to be taken to it. My hope is that after everybody has had a chance to read it that we will sit down together to review and discuss it.

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The memo, intended only for internal consumption, ended up being printed in full in Variety. Disney Chairman Michael Eisner privately fumed about the leak. Twenty years later, the memo makes for fascinating reading. Movie stars were bad for business. It results in us getting punished for failure and having no upside in success. The memo anticipates some of the biggest changes in studio thinking about making family-oriented movies, especially when you realize that the most successful family movies are animated.

But if you were to point to a company that exemplifies that vision of a studio, it would be Pixar. Pixar has always been three steps ahead of the company Katzenberg went on to found, DreamWorks Animation, both in terms of commercial consistency and awards-season plaudits. But maybe he should consider re-reading the memo after all. What Katzenberg said in is still true now — for all the appeal of new technology and special effects, the original idea is king.

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Peter Bart: Quibi Success Would Mean Jeffrey Katzenberg Might Be Right This Time

The memo, intended only for internal consumption, ended up being printed in full in Variety. Disney Chairman Michael Eisner privately fumed about the leak. Twenty years later, the memo makes for fascinating reading. Movie stars were bad for business. It results in us getting punished for failure and having no upside in success. The memo anticipates some of the biggest changes in studio thinking about making family-oriented movies, especially when you realize that the most successful family movies are animated.

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Jeffrey Katzenberg’s notorious memo: How does it hold up 20 years later?

Naturally, the memo leaked, and was widely ridiculed in the Hollywood trade press as a consequence. Thanks to the wonderful Letters Of Note, you can read it in full here. In fact, given that as he wrote it, Disney was in the business of releasing over 40 pictures a year into cinemas, an awful lot has changed. So what did he predict, and what actually happened? Glad you asked…. Ad — content continues below. Singles and doubles was the old way, with a focus on lots of smaller projects that do reasonably well with the occasional home run, rather than big ones that need to be huge hits to bring in profit.

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The Talk of Hollywood; Though a Year Old, Disney Memo Still Provokes Gossip

One year ago, Jeffrey Katzenberg, the chairman of the Walt Disney studios, wrote the memo that rocked Hollywood. Not that Mr. Katzenberg said anything startling or even surprising. Far from it. But the page document, which criticized the movie industry's "tidal wave of runaway costs and mindless competition" and chastised his own company for making the big budget, low-profit "Dick Tracy," served for months as a source of anger, resentment, debate and jokes within Hollywood. Katzenberg may have stated the obvious but -- like so much else in a world of fantasy, hype and vast wealth -- his comments stirred an outsize reaction. Katzenberg, who doesn't often refrain from expressing his views, routinely declines to discuss the memo, largely because it set off such a storm.

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