GEORGE GESSERT PDF

Artist statement from Paradise Now:. I began as a painter. The transition to plant breeding was through painting on Japanese papers, which absorb water and pigments in unpredictable ways. I became fascinated by how ink spots grow on unprepared papers. Watching them grow, and helping them along, I no longer felt like a lone artist, but connected to creative energies that already reside in materials and in the world. From ink spots to plant breeding was only a small step.

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From Leonardo. How humans' aesthetic perceptions have shaped other life forms, from racehorses to ornamental plants. Humans have bred plants and animals with an eye to aesthetics for centuries: flowers are selected for colorful blossoms or luxuriant foliage; racehorses are prized for the elegance of their frames. Hybridized plants were first exhibited as fine art in , when the Museum of Modern Art in New York showed Edward Steichen's hybrid delphiniums.

Since then, bio art has become a genre; artists work with a variety of living things, including plants, animals, bacteria, slime molds, and fungi. Many commentators have addressed the social and political concerns raised by making art out of living material. In Green Light , however, George Gessert examines the role that aesthetic perception has played in bio art and other interventions in evolution. Gessert looks at a variety of life forms that humans have helped shape, focusing on plants—the most widely domesticated form of life and the one that has been crucial to his own work as an artist.

We learn about pleasure gardens of the Aztecs, cultivated for intoxicating fragrance; the aesthetic standards promoted by national plant societies; a daffodil that looks like a rose; and praise for weeds and wildflowers. Manipulating the sexual organs of plants is where we've intervened in evolution, where we see the most durable marks of our cultures. Gessert's stunningly clear and delicately poetic series of notes presents the durable preoccupations that have informed the manipulation of life, including a comprehensive survey of contemporary biotech art and the patient multigenerational folk art of plant and animal breeders.

Green Light illuminates that we can continue to re-imagine our relationship with other living things and, through bio art, 'imagine ourselves into the future. Ksenia Fedorova. Susan Schuppli.

Search Search. Search Advanced Search close Close. Preview Preview. Add to Cart Buying Options. Request Permissions Exam copy. Overview Author s Praise. Summary How humans' aesthetic perceptions have shaped other life forms, from racehorses to ornamental plants.

Share Share Share email. Authors George Gessert George Gessert is an artist whose work focuses on the overlap between art and genetics. His exhibits often involve plants he has hybridized or documentation of breeding projects. Reviews [A] more than fascinating collection of notes about genetics and evolution in the context of art, and vice versa, and the aesthetic interventions of Homo sapiens.

Leonardo Reviews. Endorsements Manipulating the sexual organs of plants is where we've intervened in evolution, where we see the most durable marks of our cultures. Green Light illuminates that we can continue to re-imagine our relationship with other living things and, through bio art, 'imagine ourselves into the future Natalie Jeremijenko xClinic, New York University.

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From Leonardo. How humans' aesthetic perceptions have shaped other life forms, from racehorses to ornamental plants. Humans have bred plants and animals with an eye to aesthetics for centuries: flowers are selected for colorful blossoms or luxuriant foliage; racehorses are prized for the elegance of their frames. Hybridized plants were first exhibited as fine art in , when the Museum of Modern Art in New York showed Edward Steichen's hybrid delphiniums. Since then, bio art has become a genre; artists work with a variety of living things, including plants, animals, bacteria, slime molds, and fungi.

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Gessert began his career as a painter and printmaker, and began breeding plants as an art form in the late s. Beginning in the s, Gessert's work focused on the overlap between art and genetics, and he has exhibited a series of installations of hybrids and documentation of breeding projects. George Gessert was born in in Milwaukee , Wisconsin. Gessert creates his artistic irises by hybridizing wild varieties and discarding undesirable results. He is especially interested in plant aesthetics and ways that human aesthetic preferences affect evolution. Gessert calls his practice "genetic folk art," and his work points to the way nature is interpreted—even authored—by humans. Gessert's work mainly focuses on irises and other ornamental flowers.

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